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Oncology

  • Dr. Nicola Wilson

    Dr. Nicola Wilson

    Dr. Wilson was born in Canada and graduated from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in Saskatchewan in 2006.  She then completed an internship at Oklahoma State University the following year. In 2010, she completed her residency in internal medicine here at Gulf Coast Veterinary Specialists. After leaving Gulf Coast, Dr. Wilson was awarded The Fred and Vola Palmer Fellowship allowing her to complete a second residency in veterinary oncology. Dr. Wilson’s medical interests include lymphoma, translational medicine and the multi-modal approach to cancer therapy as a means of improving patient survival while minimizing negative side effects. Dr. Wilson enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband Kevin and two dogs, Annie and Trigger.  

  • Dr. Lisa DiBernardi

    Dr. Lisa DiBernardi

    Dr. Lisa DiBernardi graduated from Louisiana State University in 1999. Her internship followed at Veterinary Specialists of South Florida. She went on to complete the first of two oncology residencies; one at Purdue University in medical oncology and a second at LSU in radiation oncology. Afterwards, she worked in San Antonio, TX at GCVS's satellite clinic for one year. Dr. DiBernardi is one of a small number of oncologists who are board certified in both medical and radiation oncology.  In addition to seeing patients, Dr. DiBernardi volunteers her professional services at special event venues with the canine detection teams.  She has also treated several cancer patients of the Miami Metro Zoo and Shy Wolf Sanctuary.   Dr. DiBernardi's professional interests include clinical pathology and pain management with a focus on improving the patient's quality of life.  

  • Dr. Sindy Piscoya

    Dr. Sindy Piscoya

    Dr. Piscoya graduated from Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine in 2011. Following graduation, she completed a one-year rotating internship in Small Animal medicine in 2012 and a one-year oncology internship at Georgia Veterinary Specialists in 2013. Dr. Piscoya then completed a three-year medical oncology residency at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2016.  Her special interests include diagnosing and managing mast cell tumors, lymphoma and osteosarcomas as well as multi-modal treatment options for better pain management and improvement of quality of life. Dr. Piscoya is fully bilingual in English and Spanish.

  • What is a Diplomate of Veterinary Oncology?

    An Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) is a veterinarian who is board certified in either Radiology (Diagnostic Imaging) or Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy). To become a board-certified radiologist, a four-year degree in biology, life sciences, animal science or a related field is required, followed by attending a four-year veterinary medical school, resulting in the degree ofDoctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM). The doctor then undergoes a one year internship in either private practice or at a University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. This internship perfects his/her skills in small animal surgery and medicine. After their internship, the potential oncologist moves into a tow or three year residency program at either a University Teaching Hospital or large private specialty practice, in order to advance his/her training in veterinary oncology or radiation oncology. After their residency, the potential oncologist must pass a rigorous series of examinations and in some cases must perform a research project, present the results, and have them published in a medical or veterinary medical journal.

    • A minimum of one year internship, either in private practice or at a University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, perfecting skills in small animal surgery and medicine.
    • Two to three years of residency in Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy). Most residencies are conducted at University Teaching Hospitals or Large Private Specialty Practices, with a wide variety of cases and the resident undergo advanced training in veterinary radiation oncology.

    To become a “Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Radiology (Radiation Oncologist)” (i.e. board certified), the doctor must:

    • See a specified number and variety of cases during his/her residency.
    • Pass a rigorous series of examinations (written) in order to prove competency in all areas of Veterinary Radiation Oncology.
    • What is Diplomate of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Medical Oncology)?

    An American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) Diplomate is a veterinarian who is board certified in either cardiology, internal medicine, medical oncology, or neurology. Requirements to become a board certified medical oncologist are as follows:

    • Four-year Bachelor of Science degree in biology, life sciences, animal science, or related fields.
    • Four years of veterinary medical school resulting in the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM).
    • A minimum of one year internship, either in private practice or at a University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, perfecting skills in small animal surgery and medicine, or equivalent broad-base clinical experience.
    • Satisfactory completion of a three year residency program in Medical Oncology

    To become a “Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Medical Oncology)” (i.e. board certified), the doctor must:

    • See a specified number and variety of cases during his/her residency
    • Demonstrate unquestionable moral character and impeccable professional behavior
    • Perform a research project and present the results
    • Have the results of the research published in a refereed medical or veterinary medical journal
    • Pass a rigorous series of examinations in order to prove competency in all areas of Veterinary Medical Oncology